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There's a growing demand for eLearning in the workplace, training and academic environments. Even the government has recognised the significance, with the multi-million-pound fund for adult learning announced in 2018.  The following example explores how eLearning IS a good investment for induction and induction training purposes. The scenario is based on a real company with made-up characters and estimated figures. 

Training Issues - Global Market Research Company

Meet Joanne, she's the HR Director for a global market research company. They have a high staff turnover with interviews and inductions taking place on a monthly basis throughout the UK.

Candidates who pass the interview process are then sent for induction training, an intensive process that is normally done in two parts.

Currently, Jo and her team pay for the venues, the candidates time, the trainers time, meal, travel and accommodation expenses. Jo is becoming frustrated, despite putting the resource and funding she does into the training, new recruits are dropping out before the training is finished or failing their initial assessment.  

Costs & Savings

Doing some research of her own, Jo discovered the following,

  1. Despite being issued the company training guidelines, power points and materials, the training managers were all putting their own spin on how to do the job. This was resulting in a lower pass rate for new recruits when it came to their first assessment.
  2. The training whilst interactive in terms of teamwork, role play etc…was quite intense, time-consuming and didn't engage the trainees.

Her friend Tom suggested she investigates using eLearning. Jo began by looking at the costs. Currently, the inductions take 1 day and the induction training is 2 more. So, 3 days in total to train a new field researcher.

On average there are 12 trainees at each training session, every month in 12 different locations. She allows £10 per head for meals and £25 per head for travel expenses per day. The venue costs vary but she works on an average of £150 per day. 

So, on average she is spending...

She stops there, she’s spending an average of £310,440 a year on induction training before even calculating the cost of the printed materials needed, the training managers salaries etc… a large budget for such a high dropout and failure rate something needed to change.

She arranged a few meetings with eLearning companies and soon realised that the cost of creating a bespoke induction and training programme would save her money straight away, with quotes ranging from £50,000 to £100,000 to produce the modules she needed, a saving of at least £210,440 a year! It was a no-brainer!

More Than Financial Benefits

Jo realised that producing bespoke eLearning would provide more than financial benefits, it would also provide...

  • a more consistent approach
  • flexibility 
  • lower carbon footprint
  • measurable results

If you have a similar project in mind, get in touch we’re always happy to chat.

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